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Exploring the opposition of Lobel frames

PostPosted: Sat Oct 02, 2021 2:44 am
by Eric
Back in time last May.
I have experimented with the opposition of identical modules.
Specifically here for each construction, two identical and simple Lobel frames (a central polygon (triangle, square, pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon) surrounded by 1, 3 or 5 rows of triangles).
Opposed and rotated slightly to align the vertices of the central polygon with the sides of the central polygon of the opposite Lobel frame.

For the one with a triangular base, if we only put one row of triangles, that makes the basic icosahedron ;-)

20210525_143806.jpg

The observations I made:
The fewer sides the central polygon has, the higher the shape obtained will be.
Conversely, the more sides the central polygon has, the more the final shape will be large and flattened, and therefore the more the angles of the join between the two Lobel frames will be closed.

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Re: Exploring the opposition of Lobel frames

PostPosted: Sat Oct 02, 2021 2:47 am
by Eric
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Re: Exploring the opposition of Lobel frames

PostPosted: Sat Oct 02, 2021 2:51 am
by Eric
Admittedly, a Lobel frame with a hexagonal base is completely flat,
20210525_022626.jpg

but when you put two in opposition, slightly turned relative to each other, the result is not flat at all !!!
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Re: Exploring the opposition of Lobel frames

PostPosted: Sat Oct 02, 2021 3:00 am
by Eric
Hexagonal base:
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Heptagonal base:
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Octagonal base:
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Look at those wavy shapes 8-)
No need to go further, because from the enneagone and above, the angles are too closed between the 2 Lobel frames (I already cheated with the octogonal-base Lobel Frames by using bigger spheres on the edges).

Re: Exploring the opposition of Lobel frames

PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2021 8:57 pm
by Peter Jepsen
Very very nice research work Eric! Both structurally and visually pleasing to admire. Compliments!!

I am trying to mentally ping-pong modular ideas off of your shapes but so far I've come up blank. They do look very nice by themselves too though. :)

As far as I know, the flat top of the heptagon is the _first_ reinforced flat heptagonal polygon shape I have ever seen with Geomag. :)

Peter